Michelin Revolutionary Tires — The Most Wonderful Tires  
 

October 09, 2005

By: David Parker
Website: http://www.buying-tires.com

Michelin Revolutionary Tires — The Most Wonderful Tires

In the series of Michelin revolutionary tires, its airless tire called Tweel is the most wonderful tire. More than 100 years after putting the first inflatable tires on a car, the world's largest tire maker Michelin has developed a new revolutionary tire and wheel combination (Tweel) that can't blow out or go flat in absence of air. This Michelin revolutionary tire is a specially designed air-less tire that consists of tread, sheer band, deformable wheel and flexible spokes. Its innovative hub and new flexible spoke design replaces the need for air pressure and not only this, but also allows some vehicles the ability to climb stairs and navigate most difficult and uneven terrain. This truly innovative tire has fewer components than a pneumatic tire, is immune to nails or a knife, and the tread lasts two to three times longer, according to the company.

On 9th Jan 2005, at the North American International Auto Show (NAIAS), Michelin showcased this futuristic tire “Tweel”, an integrated tire and wheel combination without air, eliminating the need for air pressure monitors, which will be required on all new cars and spare tires, adding weight. So, let’s see how it works: Flexible polyurethane spokes and a layer of rubber that wraps around the spokes replace the air that normally cushions riders. Though riding on an airless tire may sound like a bumpy ride, but according to the company sources the innovative spokes absorb most of the road shock.

The future seems really bright for these innovative tires. Not just these real-world applications, but Michelin has additional projects also for Tweel on construction skidsteers, mining and a variety of military vehicles. The first commercial use of the Tweel will be on iBOT wheelchairs that can climb stairs. However, the most fascinating application may be Michelin's early prototype Tweel fitment for passenger cars. The company even released a new video of promising Tweel performance on an Audi A4 and it was remarkable. "There's a development curve," Michelin spokeswoman Lynn Mann said. "You start out with a low-speed, low-weight application like iBOT. Then you go from that to golf carts and construction equipment. It takes a few steps before you get to passenger vehicles."



Author Notes:

David Parker contributes and publishes news editorial to http://www.buying-tires.com.  David Parker is a successful author and regular contributor to http://www.buying-tires.com. A top resource for tires, including articles with compari

 
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